academic cohort, Academic job market, Academic relevance, Beyond the PhD, doctoral skills

Beyond the PhD: Careers Outside Academia

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I recently spoke at a PhD & Beyond panel at RMIT. The aim was the give current doctoral students an idea of careers post completion and outside academia. I was the ‘newbie’ – freshly minted 18 months prior, and sitting alongside such distinguished alumni as nanotechnologist Dr Amanda Barnard, the recipient of the prestigious 2014 Feynman Prize for Nanotechnology (Theory).

Not only is Amanda the first Australian in the Prize’s 22-year history to win the award, she’s also the first woman, and it was no surprise to discover she completed her PhD in 17 months. She’s a high achiever, and she has achieved a great deal. Let’s just say that by the time I got up to speak, I was feeling a tad anxious.

Sure I had my PhD and completed it full time, on time, while working full time in another job – and with two children. But what did I have to tell people anyway? As a single mother I am not pursuing illustrious post doc placements overseas, and while I have a publication record that is hardly shabby, I found my current job in strategic communications when I started the doctorate, not post doctorate.

I was eagerly taking notes from the panel because the speakers had such good advice. The intention of the evening was to enable the current HDR candidates to hear from those who have gone before them and the pathways they have taken since finishing their PhD. There is a growing awareness in universities of the need to prepare doctoral candidates for the fact that the journey post PhD is one that is very different from previous generations.

While perhaps 60 % of higher education graduates find their way into an academic career of sorts, that still leaves 40 % who need a new way of looking at their future post completion. You either think that any career outside academia is second best, or change your mind set. There are interesting, high level positions that need the skills you have. The key is finding them, marketing yourself and letting go of the ‘holy grail’ of a lecturing role. I even wonder how many people actually like teaching anyway. Certainly, the best way to learn how to teach isn’t by doing a PhD. My first degree was a Bachelor of Education, and I went straight into a career in journalism after I graduated. However, I never regretted the B.Ed, and knowing how to teach and plan a curriculum. I may not have taught in schools, but I was education editor at a daily newspaper, and I worked as a sessional lecturer while doing the PhD.

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On one hand, we are told there is a PhD employment crisis. The PhD is too narrow, too theoretical and graduates have challenges finding work. On the other hand, the knowledge economy is hungry for highly skilled workers who can thrive in the modern labor market. So what are the post graduation tips and outcomes?

I have been busy interviewing graduates about their pathways and advice, and will publish these in 100 Days to the Doctorate in the blogs ahead. What comes through is that there are no clear pathways, but there are opportunities. A PhD provides you with excellent skills and networks, but to make the most of this in the new economy, you need to be able to understand how to apply these to the market place.

Not finding an academic job doesn’t mean you or your doctoral study have been a failure. It means you need to look elsewhere. Outside a system that says no and into one that will embrace your skills. The conversation about whether universities should be taking on so many doctoral students is one I cannot imagine will be had. Students = money, after all, so the next best thing is that universities add essential work placement training and entrepreneurial skills along with research study courses.

I do not for a moment think my PhD was a waste of time because I do not have an academic job. Life in academia is far from perfect, after all. I know of many people in varying academic disciplines who have gladly chucked in their lecturing roles (‘it’s just teaching anyway’) to find something more creative, lucrative and fulfilling – and less stressful. And of course, the lament of those in the ‘bottom rung’ of academia, as eloquently reported by The Guardian’s “Academics Anonymous” blog is a thankless job with “low pay (relative to peers in industry), the short fixed-term contracts, the expectation that you constantly move universities and countries with no guarantee of a permanent position”.

While I have kept the same day job for the past six years, my research and writing has been – and continues to be – informed by my academic study. I have honed my research and analytical skills, and undertaking a large writing and research project doesn’t phase me. With academic articles and citations to my credit, I am also making a name for myself in a range of interdisciplinary areas beyond creative writing. It’s important to understand what you stand for, what your brand means, and your unique point of difference in a crowded market place. And these are skills you need to start honing while undertaking your doctorate.

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Certainly, that was the case with the panellists on the Beyond the PhD panel. The five alumni (including myself) from diverse fields spoke about what career paths we took since graduating. What students wanted to hear was; how did we get our current job, what kinds of jobs were we looking at, were we at any stage seeking an academic career? And any career advice we would have liked to have heard when we were first starting out.

The speakers; Dr Amanda Barnard; Dr Patrick Clifton; Dr Erjiang (Frank) Fu and Dr Jeff Fang and myself are currently all in full time employment in jobs that were not in the academic field, but that all utilise skills we gained from our academic study.

Despite having 160 peer reviewed journal articles to her credit and a stunning list of attainments, Dr Amanda Barnard’s current position as a CSIRO Office of the Chief Executive (OCE) Science Leader and the head of the Virtual Nanoscience Laboratory at the CSIRO involves just 20 % research and 80% of ‘the other stuff’ she told the audience. “Research is now the cherry on the cake for me,” she said. Sound familiar to anyone trying to squeeze research into a post doc career?

Amanda Barnard’s tips are based on her own experience travel early – because other career demands get in the way later on. Get out early and meet those people and make those collaborations – those contacts stay with you. Be generous with your research – you gain more than you lose by sharing. And for anyone who thinks scientists can forget branding and hide behind their research – she advises that people who can write well and present well do really, really well. Again, being able to effectively communicate what you do is critical.

Dr Patrick Clifton works as a Research and Football Projects Analyst at the Australian Football League. Patrick looked at management consulting and marketing jobs after his doctorate, but his passion for sports lead him to search out sports administration jobs. His advice: How do you leverage your core strengths and unique skill set from doing a PhD? Don’t underestimate the analytical skills gained from a PhD, and remember when trying to find work, the advertised job market is only 10 – 20 % of the job market. The more people you can speak to about breaking into non academic fields, the better. And finally, don’t ask for a job – ask people for advice, and describe your background to them.

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Dr Frank Fu is a Senior Environmental IT Specialist Climate and Water Division Australian Bureau of Meteorology. He started his talk by challenging us to ask why we decided to do a PhD in the first place. A good point, as we all have different reasons. However, as Dr Fu reminded us “you don’t have to be an academic to achieve life’s purpose.” He realised his PhD had skilled him up as an excellent researcher and problem solver – and he took those skills out of the academic environment and into another area. So, how do you achieve this? Again, the advice is to talk to people about your desired career.

Dr Jeff Fang has recently become the Senior Research Officer (Performance Auditor) at the Department of the Legislative Assembly, Victoria Parliament, where his responsibilities include leading, managing and mentoring a group of research staff on various inquires within the Public Accounts and Estimates Committee. Jeff said he always wanted to ‘make a difference’, and did his PhD because he wanted to advance his knowledge and skills.

Like many doctoral graduates globally, despite having tutored, lectured, published papers, and everything else to get a foothold in academia, it was not meant to be. “I never got the opportunity to be a lecturer – so I look at the strengths I got from my PhD, which were writing, research, analysis and problem solving, and applied those skills to other jobs,” he said.

Jeff’s advice is to show that you can transfer your skills and knowledge gained in the doctorate into industry. Show that you can write and view your PhD as project management.

“Try to lead or coordinate a small group when you are doing a PhD – this way you show you have management skills and are capable of managing a small group.

“You need to increase your presentation and communication skills and you can do this by participating in the Three Minute Thesis Competition, for instance. And try to establish good relationships with your supervisors, as these people will be your best allies for a reference check when you go for jobs.”

Finally, Jeff warned not to ‘show off your intelligence’ when going for a job after your graduate. A PhD can be intimidating for many people and he suggested emphasising instead what you have learnt through the PhD journey that can add value to the position.

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All great advice. So what did I have to add?

My journey was different from the rest of the panel. I already had a career in journalism before I started the doctorate, and I arrived at the PhD at the same time in my life as I was juggling the need to work full time with raising two children. The doctoral study had to fit into that mix, especially after the first semester when I was offered a scholarship that meant I didn’t have to pay fees, but wasn’t going to get a living allowance. Catch 22 – I had to do the PhD full time in order to get the fee support.

That meant I had to keep my day job in order to support my children. What made that possible for me was the fact that I was working and studying at the same university, so I was across the road from my supervisor and next door to the library. I could use my lunch breaks meeting my supervisor or going to the library or helpful sessions provided on research and publishing by the School of Graduate Research.

I didn’t undertake this mammoth task to be superwoman, but because there were financial benefits to not paying fees, and because I was super efficient with my time and advanced with my research. My core strengths – apart from being a highly skilled and efficient writer and communicator – are being able to quickly synthesise new information, make links and generate new ideas; and being incredibly focused and driven. That served me well as a communications strategist and doctoral student.

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When the going got tough and I sat in my supervisor’s office crying and wondering if I should get an extension, she told me “what makes you think your life will be easier in six months time?” Tough talk, but true. She added “you are so far ahead of everyone else doing it easy, I have no doubt you can finish ahead of them, despite your circumstances.” I am ever thankful for her belief in my abilities, and compassion when I needed it. And yes, the tough talk as well. Sometimes you need someone to say ‘suck it in, sister’.

So – I had convenient geographical location of work and study within the same university, academic and pastoral support from my supervisor and the university’s School of Graduate Research and family support with my children. I put in two to three hours of study, research and writing every night on top of my paid work and parenting commitments, and spent the weekends studying. I had no social life, I let the housework go and paid no attention to my health (and I paid for all these things after completion, believe me). It was all about kids, work, study. However, my role in the university art gallery kept me involved in a fascinating mix of cultural activities, with an enviable array of top Australian and international artists and curators. My job is varied, creative and interesting. It’s not like I was sitting in an office writing tedious reports all day. 

Since December 2013 when I graduated, I have been picking up the pieces, getting my health, house and life back into shape – and at the same time trying to establish some sort of ad hoc non academic research and writing career.   

Though we have diverse backgrounds and fields, everyone on the panel was equally savvy about making best use of what was available to them. We all played to our core strengths and didn’t squander a second of the time we spent doing our doctorates. Patrick Clifton has bountiful people skills, and made connections in areas he was keen to work, always keeping his passions in mind when finding a career that merged sport with his analytical skills. Both Jeff Fang and Frank Fu were able to take a lateral and strategic view of their doctoral skills and apply them to areas outside academia, while Amanda Barnard completed her PhD in theoretical condensed matter physics in just 17 months because she was offered a job a year into her research and she was strongly motivated to finish.

A common thread was that in each of our different areas, and with our different strengths, we each instinctively looked for and seized the opportunities that were in front of us. None of these had “opportunity’ glowing in flashing lights and with arrows pointing to them, but they were there.

A tip from the world of marketing – no matter what you are studying, take some time to do a SWOT analysis of your own Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats when thinking of positioning yourself in a career post doctorate. Write up a possible list of people in fields you’d like to work in and approach them for advice, and offer something back. When it comes to networking, ask not what others can do for you, but what you can do for them. You are a newbie, after all, they have the runs on the board. Even if it is buying them coffee, do something to show your gratitude for the time they have taken to help you.

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Academic conferences, Brand Identity, CliFi, conferences, Early Career Reseacher, networking, Tweeting research, Uncategorized, University life

Tweet that: reporting at academic conferences

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I have recently returned from an academic conference in Canberra with a new appreciation of how Tweeting at conferences can expand your participation in the event – both with other participants (both those who Tweet and those who don’t) and in your own understanding and appreciation of other papers. Tweeting focuses and distills your understanding – and yes, it can also distract and fragment your energy and concentration.

So – why do it, and if you do, how to get the best out of your conference Tweeting?

My involvement in The Affective Habitus Conference in Canberra from 19-21 June, 2014, included pre conference media and in conference live Tweeting. This was my first conference where I was both presenting and Tweeting, both as myself and also as postgraduate committee member for Aslec-Anz (the Association for the Study of Literature, Environment & Culture, Australia and New Zealand.

The Affective Habitus (New Environmental Histories of Botany, Zoology and Emotions) conference tackled issues of climate change from a humanities and science perspective. The papers were thought provoking, challenging, and asked us to consider among other things; plant subjectivity, depression as a shared creative endeavour, our connection with the ocean and the concept that the ice core remembers us from a time long before we humans even had a concept Antarctica existed.

Not surprisingly, the beautifully constructed papers and provocative topics lent themselves to Tweeting – broadcasting information live in neat soundbites of information.

Tweeting at conferences is a great way to get these ideas out. I was Tweeting under my own Twitter handle and also that of the conference organiser Aslec-ANZ – as was a colleague and several other conference participants. We all managed to Tweet slightly different versions of the same information, so that a talk became a multi facted version of itself, as if you are standing at a mutli panelled mirror and each version of the reflected imaged slightly changed.

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While there are some obvious measures to take when Tweeting at a conference – everyone sticking to the same conference hashtag for a start (such as The Affective Habitus hastag #ecohab14), I was interested to see that Brian Croxall at the Chronicle of Higher Education suggesting that conference participants also provide their Twitter handle up front when they begin their presentation, so others can Tweet their talk effectively. That’s a great idea, as it makes attribution easier. Not everyone can be easy to find on Twitter!

Two conference participants in particular at Affective Habitus – the dynamic Eileen Joy – (@EileenAJoy) and equally media savvy Siobhan O’Sullivan – have a large social media following and well known, easily found Twitter handles. For the others I tried searching them out and when I couldn’t find them, I simply added their full names for attribution.

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Croxall suggests that two rules to keep in mind both as the Tweeter and the Tweeted; for those presenting, expect to be tweeted and assume (or hope) you will be, and for the person Tweeting – do so professionally, respecting people wishes not to be photographed or their words broadcast if they make that clear. However, most people are delighted to have their ideas disseminated via social media. I personally always ask permission before I take someone’s photograph for Twitter  – except in  the case of a remote keynote when it is a case of dissemination of knowledge via electronic media (skype/video) anyway.

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Then there is the vexed problem of tweeting at a conference social gathering, such as the conference dinner or drinks. Does one Tweet images and conversation? My feeling is that when it comes to photos, perhaps approach the keynotes with key people (especially if they are a little glam and dressed up) but do it early before you and they have had a drink to unwind, and respect the edict “no – not at this social event’. And as for Tweeting social talk – just don’t. My motto is be interesting, but not invasive. And besides, at the social gatherings, you are there to relax and network and get to know those in your field better, not to broadcast the gossip! It goes without saying, never Tweet and drink.

That gets us to an interesting point – if there are so many restrictions, and Tweeting can be so invasive for everyone, why tweet at all? There is a school of thought that says “Don’t Tweet. Pay attention to the conference presentations, or you are wasting your time.” A valid point, except when you are in charge of promoting the conference – and helping promote the message of the conference, as I was.

But I also discovered that Tweeting at conferences boosts the visibility of your own paper, and your own profile in your chosen subject area.

My paper was on Cli-Fi – or climate change inspired science fiction. Using the pace and narrative technique of science fiction – an ideas based genre – my goal is to entertain and inform taking the readers into deep ecological ideas and animal rights issues through a fast paced story line. I Tweeted something about this and discovered a rich vein of like minded followers under the #clifi tag.

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Don’t lose sight of the fact that conferences are about communicating ideas, and in these days of the Internet, we need to think beyond the walls of the conference venue and communicate globally – a hasthtag (such as #ecohab14) can take your message and research across countries, continents, hemispheres. I may have been sitting in the Humanities Research Centre at ANU, stealthily acquiring a cold of epic proportions along with plenty of ideas for my next paper and next book, but my Tweets broadcast the conference well beyond the graceful streets, brilliant but cold blue skies of a Canberra morning out to the world. From somewhere so remote, in effect, as the pinprick on a continent in the southern hemisphere, we connect. One Tweet is a ripple in the pond of information, forever spreading. 

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But – that said – there is a downside to Tweeting at the conference – for the Tweeter – as you do not get to give the papers your undivided attention, because you are constantly on the look out for ‘sound bites’. Now, some presenters are adept in the art of the sound bite, encapsulating their key message in a pithy quote early on. Others speak in realms of poetic sound bites, their pens deftly carrying verbal hooks that have lulled audiences for years into sailing with them on their thoughts. Then – there are those for whom the every act of public speaking is a painful event, and the act of writing for the public is lost in the assumed worth of their words. This is perhaps when it is time to abandon the notion of Tweeting that paper at all, unless it is of vital importance and you can curate their research in 140 characters for them.

Like writing notes, Tweeting allows you synthesise important points of someone’s paper, and also become a short hand for your own notes looking back at conference proceedings. I use my Tweeting and Retweeting as a way of curating information for myself – my rule is if I want to read it again and find it valuable, then I’ll Tweet it. It is an archive of curated media in a seam of information that I constantly refer back to.

Dr Katie Mack – @AstroKatie – is a researcher at the University of Melbourne’s School of Physics who spreads her science message via social media (she has a huge following! Check her out). In an article in the June 2014 university magazine “Unlocking the secret of tweet success” AstroKatie says “The number one question people ask me about using Twitter as a scientist is, “How much time does it take?” – her response – Twitter is an ongoing conversation you dip in and out of when you have a spare moment.

I agree. By live Tweeting, I am capturing my note taking and refining it to succinct points, and also pushing that into the Twittersphere with other interpretations of that event – I imagine this as a Hydra, with entangled threads of information weaving their way into cyberspace, but all connected to a single entity – the conference, the speaker. It’s an ongoing conversation where some points may be taken up by others, and some may not. It’s my interpretation, my voice in the conversation, about what is going on.

I certainly didn’t spend all my time Tweeting at the conference – but I did spend a lot of time listening for soundbites. Fond memories of my days as a journalist. However, those days have been taken over my my life in academia, and that’s a world where one goes deeper into the topic. One thing I do know is that Tweeting, like any communication, is done for an audience. Those I had in mind at the Affective Habitus conference were those who were interested in the conversation about the environment, ecocriticism, and science and the humanities.

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I also found it fascinating to connect with others while live tweeting – who out there was also interested in what the conference topic was? In short, conference Tweeting is about networking on a global scale and being part of a bigger conversation.

Academic conferences, Academic Study, conferences, creative writing, Creative Writing PhD, Early Career Reseacher, PhD completion, Post Doctoral Study, University life

Your doctoral cohort: network with your peers

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I’ve been reading Linked In posts about ‘what I’d tell my 22 year old self’ and one caught my eye in particular – and that was ‘network with your peers’ Specifically, writes Nicholas Thompson of the newyorker.com; “many of the good things that have come in my career have come because of the people I got to know in my early twenties.”

I think of my own career and realise how true this is. It’s the people I worked with on newspapers and magazines in my twenties that I still turn to over the years as our careers have morphed in the evolving media landscape.

I wrote and published a book with Dr Caroline van de Pol, who I met on a suburban newspaper, and then worked with on a daily newspaper, and now have shared interests in academia as we have both received our doctorates in creative writing.

But Thompson’s advice doesn’t just hold true for twentysomethings just starting out. As we move through careers, which develop and change in this age of reinvention, academia plays a key role in retraining for the future. Swap “people I met in my twenties’ for “people I met doing my doctorate” and you can see where I am heading – it is your cohort at university that is vital, no matter how old you are when you take on post graduate study.

Thompson says with the hindsight of age that it “wasn’t meeting people who were influential; it was becoming friends, and developing working relationships, with people who would become influential” that was important.

Take this advice to heart, doctoral candidates, and embrace your cohort. What I have learned is the older you get, the more retired and senile your mentors become. Sad, but true. It’s your cohort that will grow and ultimately, help you as you will help them.

Not everyone who does a doctorate does so as a fresh faced 25 year old on the roller coaster from one degree to the next. Certainly, with the creative writing doctorate, I find that most of my cohort are in fact mid career writers who have realised that they need to “Dr Up” if they are to even get a casual teaching gig anymore. And why would they want that? Because it’s always been hard to make a reliable living from just writing creatively. You need to hustle your skills where the money is – be it copywriting, communications and in the old days before the Internet, journalism. Now to make a living doing sessional teaching as well requires you have the edge by having a doctorate. Call it educational inflation, if you like, but it’s reality.

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It’s easy with the pressure to complete your doctorate in a ‘timely fashion” to concentrate on that and nothing else. But that’s only one part of the story. Your doctorate is a journey and the people you met on the way will become characters in the story of your life and career.  I am going to give you advice I never got doing my doctorate and this it – it is not what you know, it is who you know when it comes to getting an academic job at the end of your doctorate. Meritocracy is for fairy tales, alas. The cold hard truth is that the jobs advertised are so often done for show – candidates are already chosen long before the key selection criteria is sketched out by some HR consultant. Those who want a certain candidate make sure the key selection criteria fits the person they have chosen so they can get away with this sort of thing.

So, how do you get around this? Networking. And that means – making your self known, useful, by joining up, taking part, putting yourself out there and helping others up, too. Getting to know people. All very well, isn’t it, when you are struggling to finish. But there is an organic way of doing this, and that’s to be part of an academic community that meshes with your interests.

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I went to many conferences before I found ‘my people’. And I am sure these are not the only people who are playing in the same sandpit as me, either. I could find more, and should. But so far I have met a wide circle of engaged emerging academics across disciplines who have helped me as I have helped them, in some small way, to get some recognition.

“Thank you for thinking of me” I have been told many times when I have put someone’s name forth for a panel, presentation, reading, whatever – as they have put forth mine.

Thompson writes: “I’m continually working with the same people I worked with in my early twenties. I assign them stories, or I ask them for advice. They call me. We’ve built up trust.”

Don’t underestimate this ‘trust’. I was reminded of this when researching Bruce Springsteen fandom, of all things, for a paper I am toying with that looks at the power of sharing personal stories to connect with readers. I have good friends who are ‘bronze’ Springsteen fans, travelling the world to see him play. As we watched numerous Springsteen concert videos together and I took notes, one of the words that came up frequently was ‘trust’; the trust Springsteen’s fans placed in him for his authenticity, the powerful personal connection with his lyrics, and the admiration fans have in Springsteen’s trust in his own E Street Band, his primary backing band that he has surrounded himself with since 1972, and grown up with – and grown successful with – over the decades. As we say in Australia, he’s a bloke who doesn’t ditch his mates.

What is true in life and for Bruce Springsteen is also true in academia –  we need to reach out to others, and hold on to those we connect with. Yet no one tells you this when you start your doctoral journey. It’s all about impressing the professors, getting articles into high ranking journals. Completing on time.

I can hear what you are saying: “my doctoral study is so isolated I don’t meet anyone”, and “any event I go to on campus hardly anyone turns up anyway”. So true. So true. So, this is where part two of my advice comes in – network with your cohort AND find that cohort at conferences. That’s where you’ll meet your real cohort – the ones engaged in your research areas, or like-minded interdisciplinary ones.

Alas, while universities like to pride themselves on supporting doctoral students and travel to conferences, that’s not always the case, as Pat Thompson explains. In fact, the talk is cheap and the funding cheaper. Let alone support from supervisors anxious you’ll quickly overtake them.

I presented at three Inter-Disciplinary.Net  conferences in Oxford during my doctorate and through those, I made many global connections that have been important in my life and work.

 

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Maybe you are reading this in some country that seems very remote from the action – certainly in Melbourne, I feel very remote from Europe. But the Internet connects us all. I co-edited an academic book Monstrous Geographies: Places and Spaces of the Monstrous with a French doctoral student from the Sorbonne Sarah Montin, whom I met at one of those conferences in Oxford.

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We finally caught up again for a stroll around Paris and the Sorbonne when I visited last year – it was wonderful to meet and chat after spending so many hours corresponding via email about the project as we edited it over many months. And Sarah gave me behind the scenes tour of that glorious Parisian university.

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Closer to home, I am a postgraduate committee member for ASLEC-ANZ – The Association for the Study of Literature, Environment and Culture — Australia and New Zealand , along with my counterpart, Emma Nicoletti. ASLEC-ANZ membership comprises writers, artists, cinematographers, and musicians as well as academics working in and across several areas of the Ecological Humanities, including ecocritical literary and cultural studies, environmental history and the history of science, anthropology and ecophilosophy. The 2014 biennial conference “Affective Habitus” takes places in June in Canberra and together with Emma and others, we are currently planning an informal post grad event of arts practitioner readings – and who are we turning to? Our cohort. From one toss of the pebble, the circles of influence and connection grow. But first you have to pick up that pebble…

It’s vital to go to conferences because you network and by socialising with your cohort you start making connections and organic links with people who share common research interests. And go to an academic’s book launch and support them! (That’s me in the crowd when Dr Peter Singer launched Dr Siobhan O’Sullivan’s book ‘Animals, Equality and Democracy’ . I got to know Siobhan at a conference in Brisbane at the start of my doctorate, and was invited to her animal studies reading group; the connections I made there carried me to an animal studies conference in Utrecht and into ASLEC-ANZ, and onto the Affective Habitus conference where Siobhan is presenting a keynote address. Connections.

Despite being told over the four years of my doctorate that the only thing that matters is writing the exegesis and submitting and everything else is a distraction, this is the stuff of fear and nonsense. It was the conferences I went to and presented at over those four years that were vital because of the people I met – people who became important in my life in so many ways.

It’s not the people at the top you go to conferences to impress and meet – remember, they may well be dead, retired or wandering in a fog of dementia in 15 years time. No, it’s the newbies like you and me who are the ones to network with – because we are at the beginning of our academic journey and whatever our age, we are enthusiastic, tackling the latest ideas, open to possibilities and (however slowly) climbing the academic ladder. You will do well to keep liaising with them over the years, and like me will find that it is this cohort who hold the key to the exciting opportunities.

So – get out there, chat to that other overwhelmed student you meet and really listen to what they have to say and follow them on Twitter, friend them on Facebook, get their email address, search them out on Linked In – follow their blog. When they get a book published – go to the launch and buy two copies and get them signed, keep one, and gift one and spread the love. Whatever you do, don’t lose touch but keep the momentum building.